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Help! Bad clear coat problem

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  • #16
    Re: Help! Bad clear coat problem

    I'm convinced that I need to use a d/a buffer to get these swirls and holograms out. What is the best method when going over body contours and areas where the surface is narrower than the width of the pad(such as the back of the cab behind the side windows)?

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    • #17
      Re: Help! Bad clear coat problem

      Generally speaking you can just tape off vinyl and rubber trim that runs along those areas (this is very common when working on A-pillars on virtually all vehicles) and angle up on the pad a bit to work it. Or you can pick up our new 4" pads with the proper backing plate and use them on a D/A. It sometimes does get a bit tricky and you need to get a bit creative sometimes, but these smaller areas can usually be worked very effectively.
      Michael Stoops
      Senior Global Product & Training Specialist | Meguiar's Inc.

      Remember, this hobby is supposed to be your therapy, not the reason you need therapy.

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      • #18
        Re: Help! Bad clear coat problem

        I have a few products on my Christmas list. SwirlX and Ultimate Compound. And I've decided to do this by hand even though it may take forever. I'm just wondering which one I'm supposed to use out of the two mentioned. Michael, I know you said to use Ultimate Compound, but I want to make sure this isn't too aggressive. Plus, I keep reading about UC leaving behind a white haze. Then I read a comment about SwirlX scratching the paint even as it was being whiped off. So, which one, and how do I avoid the residual effects?

        Another question came to mind. I have orange peel but it feels smooth. Will this effect the way a swirl remover works?

        BTW, I am not cocerned with getting rid of the orange peel. That doesn't bother me at all. Infact, I kind of like it for some reason.

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        • #19
          Re: Help! Bad clear coat problem

          If you're going to be working by hand, definitely go with the UC. Where are you reading about it leaving a white haze? Sounds as though someone maybe isn't using it quite right. And SwirlX scratching the paint? Someone is definitely doing something wrong there - there's just no way SwirlX can scratch your paint. Leave it on until it's dry and find yourself having to work hard to take it off and then, yes, you might mar the paint. But that sure isn't the fault of the product - that is flat out user error.

          Here's what you want to do in order to get the most out of Ultimate Compound when working by hand, basically following along with the 5 Step Paint Care Cycle:

          • Wash and dry the car fully. In good light inspect the paint for both bonded surface contaminants and below surface flaws/defects.
          • If the paint feels rough to the touch, clay it. If not then you won't gain anything by this process. For below surface defects like swirls, etching, etc you'll use the Ultimate Compound.
            • Work on a cool surface, and apply a small amount of UC to a foam applicator pad, and work it against the paint in an area no larger than 2' x 2'. Honestly, you'll probably find better results working even a smaller area than that. But work it until it becomes just a thin film on the surface, then wipe it off immediately. It should wipe off quite easily and leave very little, if any, residue behind.
            • At this point double check your effort by pulling the car back into the sun and evaluating your progress. You may find you need a second application to remove defects to your satisfaction - it all depends on how aggressively you work it, and how hard your paint is or isn't.
            • Once you've determined whether you need a second pass or not, pull the car back into the shade and continue to work around the vehicle, confining each work are to this small size.
          • At this point you can follow up with a pure polish such as M07 Show Car Glaze or Deep Crystal Polish. Here you can work a bit larger area as all you're doing is lightly working the product against the paint and then wiping it off. Keep in mind, this is an optional step. You don't have to do it.
          • Now it's time to wax - use your favorite, whether it be liquid or paste, carnauba or synthetic. But no matter which you choose, apply it very thin and uniformly. A thick coat just takes longer to dry, wastes product, and is harder to remove. It doesn't give you any more protection as only so much will bond to the paint. Go ahead and cover all the paint surfaces of the car with a thin coat, and then give it another 20 minutes or so to fully dry. If ambient temperature is below 60F or so it may take a bit longer for the wax to dry. Once it is dry just wipe off the residue with a clean, dry microfiber towel. It should just about fall off if you do it right.

          Now, all that is pretty basic stuff. It can sometimes be hard to convey what's meant by "a small amount of product" or what "a thin film" means. Have a look at this video on surface prep and it should clear up some things for you:



          Don't be concerned about Ultimate Compound being too aggressive. You're working by hand, so that drops the potential total cut of any product by a good margin. If a critical evaluation following a single application of UC (or anything else, for that matter) tells you that you have not removed all the swirls, then that also tells you that your process is not overly aggressive. When all you're looking to remove are typical swirls, you are not going deep into the paint at all. Not even close. And if you can't get rid of them completely, then you're really not being overly aggressive. Remember, how aggressive a process is depends not only on the product being used, but the applicator material, the method of application, pressure, speed, etc. But UC by hand? Not a problem.

          The orange peel won't be an issue for you either. You're application process will follow the contours of the orange peel texture, which is why you can remove the swirls without leveling the texture.

          Lastly, you are probably the only person here who actually likes orange peel. Or you're the only who will admit it! Either way, we aren't sure how to help someone who presents such a crazy idea.
          Michael Stoops
          Senior Global Product & Training Specialist | Meguiar's Inc.

          Remember, this hobby is supposed to be your therapy, not the reason you need therapy.

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: Help! Bad clear coat problem

            Lastly, you are probably the only person here who actually likes orange peel. Or you're the only who will admit it! Either way, we aren't sure how to help someone who presents such a crazy idea.
            Haha! Just one of many crazy ideas!

            Thanks for all the advice. I'm getting some cutting pads to apply the UC and polish and wax for to complete the process. I'll let you know how it comes out. Hopefully I can get through the process without further assistance.

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            • #21
              Re: Help! Bad clear coat problem

              Originally posted by Mudwalker View Post
              Haha! Just one of many crazy ideas!

              Thanks for all the advice. I'm getting some cutting pads to apply the UC and polish and wax for to complete the process. I'll let you know how it comes out. Hopefully I can get through the process without further assistance.
              Stick with polishing pads for the UC, we don't recommend using the cutting pads on the G110v2 or other D/A as they tend to haze the paint.
              Michael Stoops
              Senior Global Product & Training Specialist | Meguiar's Inc.

              Remember, this hobby is supposed to be your therapy, not the reason you need therapy.

              Comment

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