Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Peeling clearcoat - tips on how to make look less bad?

          
  1. #1
    Registered Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Dallas TX
    Posts
    9
    Rep Power
    7

    Peeling clearcoat - tips on how to make look less bad?

    Hi everyone,
    About two months ago I bought a 1994 Toyota MR2 as a project car to both work on and take to the track to learn how to drive. The clearcoat is peeling off badly, looks just like any of those in the clearcoat failure hall of fame post. I really don't really care how the car looks as long as it runs since it's purpose is for the track. That being said I wouldn't mind spending some extra time on the weekends trying to make it look LESS BAD.

    I know from other posts the only way to FIX the peeling clearcoat is a new paint job, but I'd like to see if there's a low-cost way (with me doing the work) of making it look less bad. I'd like to remove the white areas where the clearcoat is in the process of peeling off, so there would just be base coat and unpeeled clearcoat, and then I'd put on some new clearcoat to protect it all.

    Today I bought some of the Ultimate Compound and tried that - I know it's designed for paint where the clearcoat is still on, and it helped somewhat with both the base coat parts and the clearcoat parts still on, but it didn't remove any of the white transition area when the CC is flaking. Tried some leftover Deep Crystal paint cleaner, that didn't do it either.

    Any tips on just how to make it look less bad, or at least remove the white area where it's flaking? I've heard 2000 grit wet sandpaper might work. Like I said this car's purpose is to be driven at the track so looks are not critical, but if I can make it look less like this than that's a bonus. The spots on the top half are just dirt, I've since washed it off.



    Thanks all,
    Dubs

  2. #2
    'Pearly Gates' Eddie6th's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Italy
    Posts
    3,170
    Rep Power
    85

    Re: Peeling clearcoat - tips on how to make look less bad?

    I think the way would be your last option,by using fine grit and wetsanding.

    Is your intention to put another coat of clear back on after?
    Last edited by Eddie6th; Jul 4th, 2009 at 03:53 AM. Reason: add info

    TOP


  3. #3
    Na't' denavalt' ek'tal Justin A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Derry, NH
    Posts
    277
    Rep Power
    10

    Re: Peeling clearcoat - tips on how to make look less bad?

    I would wetsand the area to remove any flaking, buff out the sanding marks with M105/M205 and shoot some new clear over it to attempt to keep the problem from recurring. A partial repaint like that may or may not hold, but like you said, it's a track car and it's going to get banged up.
    If a tree falls in the forest and there's nobody there to record the event, how can you be certain that there was a tree or even a forest to begin with?

  4. #4
    Registered Member SHYNEMAN123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    DILLSBURG PA.
    Age
    52
    Posts
    1,303
    Rep Power
    776

    Re: Peeling clearcoat - tips on how to make look less bad?

    Wool pad and rotary with 3M Super Duty Compound avail at auto body supply stores and finish with # 86 SOLO wool first than foam, But do not wax and keep it out of the rain.




  5. #5
    Swirls+Surly=Swurly ClearlyCoated's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    2,279
    Rep Power
    54

    Re: Peeling clearcoat - tips on how to make look less bad?

    Quote Originally Posted by SHYNEMAN123 View Post
    Wool pad and rotary with 3M Super Duty Compound avail at auto body supply stores and finish with # 86 SOLO wool first than foam, But do not wax and keep it out of the rain.
    No sanding beforehand? What happens if you can't keep it out of the rain? I'm curious because my project car has the same level of CC failure and I've been wanting to try the same thing, but I have no covered parking. Also, what speed would you dial in on the rotary?

  6. #6
    Recovering PC Addict Bounty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Miami Florida
    Posts
    541
    Rep Power
    23

    Re: Peeling clearcoat - tips on how to make look less bad?

    Not being facetious at all here but based on all the answers (and the one I'd have given you), you will need to invest in products, machines, etc while instead taking $100 down to your local Maaco will net you a complete single stage enamel paint job of the car that will look 26573892645 times better than any "repair" you could do to that hood. Something to think about...

  7. #7
    'Pearly Gates' Eddie6th's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Italy
    Posts
    3,170
    Rep Power
    85

    Re: Peeling clearcoat - tips on how to make look less bad?

    That's the alternative.

    TOP


  8. #8
    Registered Member SHYNEMAN123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    DILLSBURG PA.
    Age
    52
    Posts
    1,303
    Rep Power
    776

    Re: Peeling clearcoat - tips on how to make look less bad?

    Quote Originally Posted by ClearlyCoated View Post
    No sanding beforehand? What happens if you can't keep it out of the rain? I'm curious because my project car has the same level of CC failure and I've been wanting to try the same thing, but I have no covered parking. Also, what speed would you dial in on the rotary?
    The paint will absorb the moisture and chalk back out again this is only a temporary fix, it will come back but a great piece to learn on.

    as far as speed I compound around 1500 and keep the pad spurred out.




  9. #9
    Swirls+Surly=Swurly ClearlyCoated's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    2,279
    Rep Power
    54

    Re: Peeling clearcoat - tips on how to make look less bad?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bounty View Post
    Not being facetious at all here but based on all the answers (and the one I'd have given you), you will need to invest in products, machines, etc while instead taking $100 down to your local Maaco will net you a complete single stage enamel paint job of the car that will look 26573892645 times better than any "repair" you could do to that hood. Something to think about...
    For me, it's more of an experimentation thing, a chance to get some practice time behind the rotary just to see what I can do with my DeWalt. I know your comment was directed more to the OP, but I wouldn't mind getting some real hands on experience performing some wetsanding and removing the sanding marks with both a DA and rotary on my 93 Civic (currently in the death throes of clear coat failure). After all is said and done, I would sneak my Civic under the cover of darkness to Maaco or Earl Scheib to get a low priced paint job. And after that, possibly some more skill building with wet sanding and reducing any orange peel!

  10. #10
    Recovering PC Addict Bounty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Miami Florida
    Posts
    541
    Rep Power
    23

    Re: Peeling clearcoat - tips on how to make look less bad?

    Quote Originally Posted by ClearlyCoated View Post
    For me, it's more of an experimentation thing, a chance to get some practice time behind the rotary just to see what I can do with my DeWalt. I know your comment was directed more to the OP...
    Yup...answer was for the original poster I quoted. He stated his car was a "track-only" vehicle so we know it'll sustain plenty of abuse to the paint surface after any repairs (which will only be temporary anyway). No sense investing in hundreds of dollars of pads, products, and machines to make a quick fix which will look the same in two months or worse...really damage the paint and burn thru.

    but I wouldn't mind getting some real hands on experience performing some wetsanding and removing the sanding marks with both a DA and rotary on my 93 Civic (currently in the death throes of clear coat failure). After all is said and done, I would sneak my Civic under the cover of darkness to Maaco or Earl Scheib to get a low priced paint job. And after that, possibly some more skill building with wet sanding and reducing any orange peel!
    In your case...since you already have the tools, products and desire to tackle the job I'd go to a local junkyard and pick up a panel for $10 or whatever and practice there before I attempt new techniques...especially wetsanding...on something I have to be seen in everyday.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 2 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 2 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. The Clearcoat Failure Photo Archive
    By Mike Phillips in forum Hot Topics
    Replies: 70
    Last Post: Apr 22nd, 2014, 04:02 PM
  2. Makeover tips and advice for a beginner wanted!
    By Syco Stang in forum Detailing 101
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: Aug 17th, 2008, 06:38 PM
  3. Meguiars brunei bad reputation
    By prelude86 in forum Detailing for dollars
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: Feb 14th, 2008, 06:39 AM
  4. Tips, tricks, and tools to make washing faster
    By FromThisSoil in forum Detailing 101
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: Nov 6th, 2006, 03:06 AM
  5. Replies: 11
    Last Post: Nov 4th, 2006, 08:57 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •