Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: What temperature ranges are best for applying cleaners, polishes, and waxes?

          
  1. #1
    Registered Member Mike Phillips's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Stuart, Florida
    Age
    56
    Posts
    24,797
    Rep Power
    516

    What temperature ranges are best for applying cleaners, polishes, and waxes?

    What temperature ranges are best for applying cleaners, polishes, and waxes




    When we talk about surface temperatures, we need to consider three factors:
    • Surface Temperature
    • Ambient Temperature
    • Relative Humidity
    • Surface Temperature (Actual surface temperature of the vehicle)

    The best surface temperature range for applying cleaners, polishes, and protectants is approximately 60 degrees to 80 degrees Fahrenheit. More importantly, the surface does not feel warm or hot to the touch.

    Basically, when you're working within this temperature range, it's not too cold, and it's not too warm to realize exceptional results from just about any Meguiar's product.

    Meguiar's products will work easily within a much broader temperature range, such as, 50 degrees to 90 degrees Fahrenheit, but guaranteed best results will be achieved in the 60 degrees to 80 degrees range.

    Ambient Temperature (Outside temperature)
    Ambient temperature is the room temperature or the temperature of the surrounding environment. It's easily possible to have between 10 to 50 degrees difference in ambient temperature compared to surface temperature. This can make the difference between a product that's easy to work with, or hard to work with. Keep in mind, the hotter the ambient temperature, the quicker products will dry.

    Humidity (Moisture in the air)


    Simply put, humidity is moisture in the air. Technically there is Relative Humidity and Absolute Humidity, but as it relates to:
    • Applying
    • Working with
    • Curing, drying, hazing
    • Wipe-off or removal of car care products.
    The simple explanation of moisture in the air, or more specifically, the amount of moisture in the air is the major factor, which will affect how easily or potentially difficult a product will be to work with, or a procedure will be to perform.

    Low humidity, in warm to hot temperatures, will act to cause liquids to evaporate and dry more quickly. This can make a product difficult to work with or decrease the amount of time the product remains easily workable on the surface.

    High humidity in cold temperatures can make products hard to work because it can dramatically increase the amount of time necessary for the product to cure, dry or haze (depending on which product you're using).

    Low humidity in low temperatures tends not to be a factor in working with, cure times, and when applying and in the removal of cleaners, polishes, and protectants (Low temperatures are a factor, but not low humidity in low temperatures).

    High humidity in high temperatures tends not to be a factor in working with, cure times, and when applying and in the removal of cleaners, polishes, and protectants (High temperatures are a factor, but not high humidity in high temperatures)

    Extreme temperatures, both cold and hot will make any product more difficult to work with.

    Direct sunlight
    Direct sunlight will dramatically increase the surface temperature compared to ambient temperatures and make cleaners, polishes and protectants extremely more difficult to apply, work and remove.

    Air current/Wind
    Air current/air flow, or windy conditions will act to increase the evaporation speed and potentially making some products more difficult to apply, work, or remove. In some cases this can be a bonus, helping a wax to cure/dry more quickly.

    Summary
    The best conditions for using cleaners, polishes and protectants on automotive paints would be in a cool place, out of direct sunlight, in a surface temperature range between 60 degrees and 80 degrees Fahrenheit, with comfortable to low humidity, with a light breeze to create the perfect conditions for detailing your car's finish.

    Common sense and a good rule-of-thumb is to avoid applying any product if the surface is too warm to touch with the palm of your hand comfortably.

    50 degrees Fahrenheit = 10.0 degrees Celsius
    90 degrees Fahrenheit = 32.2 degrees Celsius
    Mike Phillips
    Office: 800-869-3011 x206
    Mike.Phillips@Autogeek.net
    "Find something you like and use it often"

  2. #2
    Registered Member SeabreezeDetailing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    115
    Rep Power
    14
    Very good writeup Mike! This is extremely important information that I had to learn over time.

  3. #3
    Registered Member AeroCleanse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Neenah, WI
    Posts
    1,116
    Rep Power
    21

    Re: 4. What temperature ranges are best for applying cleaners, polishes, and waxes?

    So does that mean that surface temp is more important than air temp? So if the air temp is say 32F yet the surface temp is 70F then there shouldn't be any problems working on the surface?

  4. #4
    Registered Member Murr1525's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Age
    37
    Posts
    18,921
    Rep Power
    232

    Re: 4. What temperature ranges are best for applying cleaners, polishes, and waxes?

    That might be an extreme case, but yes, you would definately get better results than on a 32F surface.

    For instance, working in the sun in the winter is quite ok if you are up north, and even beneficial, because it will raise the surface temp a bit.
    2017 Subaru WRX Premium - WR Blue

  5. #5
    Registered Member AeroCleanse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Neenah, WI
    Posts
    1,116
    Rep Power
    21

    Re: 4. What temperature ranges are best for applying cleaners, polishes, and waxes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Murr1525 View Post
    That might be an extreme case, but yes, you would definately get better results than on a 32F surface.

    For instance, working in the sun in the winter is quite ok if you are up north, and even beneficial, because it will raise the surface temp a bit.
    Might be extreme, not where I live in Wisconsin. I was considering using water from my hot water carpet extractor (water only no chemicals in it), which gets the water up to 200F, to warm the surface up to a workable temp.

  6. #6
    Registered Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Belleville IL
    Posts
    18
    Rep Power
    10

    Re: 4. What temperature ranges are best for applying cleaners, polishes, and waxes?

    Quote Originally Posted by AeroCleanse View Post
    Might be extreme, not where I live in Wisconsin. I was considering using water from my hot water carpet extractor (water only no chemicals in it), which gets the water up to 200F, to warm the surface up to a workable temp.
    Probably not the best idea, the difference in temperature could cause the glass to crack and I have a feeling it wouldn't be the best thing for the paint.

  7. #7
    Registered Member AeroCleanse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Neenah, WI
    Posts
    1,116
    Rep Power
    21

    Re: 4. What temperature ranges are best for applying cleaners, polishes, and waxes?

    The glass to crack? I'm not washing the whole thing, just the painted area to be worked on. The extractor puts out a spray at a low volume. Not sure how this would be any worse that going to a car wash that uses hot water.

  8. #8
    Registered Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Belleville IL
    Posts
    18
    Rep Power
    10

    Re: 4. What temperature ranges are best for applying cleaners, polishes, and waxes?

    Ive seen glass crack at car washes before from hot water. As long as you let your car get somewhat warmer (above freezing) it shouldnt be an issue.

  9. #9
    Registered Member epoch_02's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    13
    Rep Power
    12

    Re: 4. What temperature ranges are best for applying cleaners, polishes, and waxes?

    Can i ask what would be low humidity?

    I have recently had a garage built and have a dehumidifier installed, once the concrete base has fully dired out my intended aim is for 60% humidity all year round, would this be ideal?

  10. #10
    Registered Member billddrummer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Reno NV
    Age
    64
    Posts
    205
    Rep Power
    6

    Re: What temperature ranges are best for applying cleaners, polishes, and waxes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Phillips View Post
    What temperature ranges are best for applying cleaners, polishes, and waxes




    When we talk about surface temperatures, we need to consider three factors:
    • Surface Temperature
    • Ambient Temperature
    • Relative Humidity
    • Surface Temperature (Actual surface temperature of the vehicle)


    The best surface temperature range for applying cleaners, polishes, and protectants is approximately 60 degrees to 80 degrees Fahrenheit. More importantly, the surface does not feel warm or hot to the touch.

    Basically, when you're working within this temperature range, it's not too cold, and it's not too warm to realize exceptional results from just about any Meguiar's product.

    Meguiar's products will work easily within a much broader temperature range, such as, 50 degrees to 90 degrees Fahrenheit, but guaranteed best results will be achieved in the 60 degrees to 80 degrees range.

    Ambient Temperature (Outside temperature)
    Ambient temperature is the room temperature or the temperature of the surrounding environment. It's easily possible to have between 10 to 50 degrees difference in ambient temperature compared to surface temperature. This can make the difference between a product that's easy to work with, or hard to work with. Keep in mind, the hotter the ambient temperature, the quicker products will dry.

    Humidity (Moisture in the air)


    Simply put, humidity is moisture in the air. Technically there is Relative Humidity and Absolute Humidity, but as it relates to:
    • Applying
    • Working with
    • Curing, drying, hazing
    • Wipe-off or removal of car care products.

    The simple explanation of moisture in the air, or more specifically, the amount of moisture in the air is the major factor, which will affect how easily or potentially difficult a product will be to work with, or a procedure will be to perform.

    Low humidity, in warm to hot temperatures, will act to cause liquids to evaporate and dry more quickly. This can make a product difficult to work with or decrease the amount of time the product remains easily workable on the surface.

    High humidity in cold temperatures can make products hard to work because it can dramatically increase the amount of time necessary for the product to cure, dry or haze (depending on which product you're using).

    Low humidity in low temperatures tends not to be a factor in working with, cure times, and when applying and in the removal of cleaners, polishes, and protectants (Low temperatures are a factor, but not low humidity in low temperatures).

    High humidity in high temperatures tends not to be a factor in working with, cure times, and when applying and in the removal of cleaners, polishes, and protectants (High temperatures are a factor, but not high humidity in high temperatures)

    Extreme temperatures, both cold and hot will make any product more difficult to work with.

    Direct sunlight
    Direct sunlight will dramatically increase the surface temperature compared to ambient temperatures and make cleaners, polishes and protectants extremely more difficult to apply, work and remove.

    Air current/Wind
    Air current/air flow, or windy conditions will act to increase the evaporation speed and potentially making some products more difficult to apply, work, or remove. In some cases this can be a bonus, helping a wax to cure/dry more quickly.

    Summary
    The best conditions for using cleaners, polishes and protectants on automotive paints would be in a cool place, out of direct sunlight, in a surface temperature range between 60 degrees and 80 degrees Fahrenheit, with comfortable to low humidity, with a light breeze to create the perfect conditions for detailing your car's finish.

    Common sense and a good rule-of-thumb is to avoid applying any product if the surface is too warm to touch with the palm of your hand comfortably.

    50 degrees Fahrenheit = 10.0 degrees Celsius
    90 degrees Fahrenheit = 32.2 degrees Celsius
    Excellent advice. I should have skipped using Ultimate Polish today. It was drying so fast it was nearly impossible to remove before it hardened into a film, which required adding even more product to remove.

    I was working outdoors in a covered parking space. Ambient temp ranged from 85-95.

    I would say that with an ambient temp of 80 degrees F or higher, UP may be difficult to work with.

    Thanks.
    2016 red Hyundai Azera, acquired with 21 miles. Drive 600+ miles/week. Commercial RE agent in CA focusing on properties in the Truckee/Lake Tahoe basin.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. What do you use to remove your cleaners/polishes?
    By Jeff Smith in forum The Break Room
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: Apr 24th, 2009, 12:09 AM
  2. Best waxes/polishes for 2006 civic
    By acv987 in forum Detailing 101
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Aug 7th, 2006, 09:54 AM
  3. ptfe in waxes/polishes
    By hardisk88 in forum Detailing 101
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: Nov 6th, 2005, 09:16 PM
  4. Paint Cleaners & Polishes
    By scott_04 in forum Detailing 101
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Mar 5th, 2005, 06:19 PM
  5. Applying polishes with G-100
    By kev4bama in forum The Dual Action Polisher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Mar 2nd, 2005, 07:46 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •