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vosstire
May 23rd, 2005, 07:54 AM
I am looking for the best method for odor removal, looking for the sure and reliable, we have used ozone equiment in the past but have had mixed results

Mike Phillips
May 23rd, 2005, 08:50 AM
Meguiar's offers a chemical approach for removing odors, on the Consumer side is our Odor Eliminator, which comes in a 10 ounce pump spray bottle,

http://meguiars.com/estore/product_detailpage.cfm?product=Car-Odor-Eliminator&sku=G-23

http://meguiars.com/estore/images/product_g23.gif


and a Professional version in a one-gallon jug in our Professional Line,


http://meguiars.com/estore/product_detailpage.cfm?product=Odor-Eliminator&sku=M-23
http://meguiars.com/estore/images/product_m23.gif

These two products work by encapsulating the offending odor Molecules.

buda
May 23rd, 2005, 12:37 PM
Odor is caused by bacteria. If you can destroy the bacteria you will destroy the odor it is as simple as that.

Example, pot-a-potties do not emit the smell of urine and feces because the water in the tank also includes bacteria eating emzymes that kill the bacteria on contact and eliminate the odor.

In an automobile you have two choices or a combination of both:

a. Chemical

b. Ozone

Both will destroy the bacteria and eliminate the odor.

With both you have to remove the source of the odor completely, feces, vomit, etc.

With chemical it MUST come in contact with the bacteria in order to kill it and eliminate the odor. Sometimes that is very difficult with chemical to hit every surface in the car that might be effected, but if you can and do it is very good.

With ozone generators you have to have a machine that generates sufficient ozone per hour, over 1000 mg or it will not do much of a job.

Why your ozone generator did not work could be for a number of reasons.

Regards
Bud Abraham
DETAIL PLUS SYSTEMS

Rockpick
May 27th, 2005, 01:04 PM
Originally posted by buda
With chemical it MUST come in contact with the bacteria in order to kill it and eliminate the odor.

With that in mind, would it make sense to apply an Odor Eliminator like #23 and then follow with light agitation with a brush or similar?

RP

Mosca
May 27th, 2005, 01:16 PM
So, what bacteria causes cigarette smoke odor?


I used the car odor eliminator to remove smoke smell from a used laptop I bought on ebay, it worked pretty well.


Tom

gb387
May 27th, 2005, 01:49 PM
Since it was brought up I have some questions about the ozone machine option... can that be done in larger rooms vs. a car? I have never seen one just heard about them. How do they work?

buda
May 27th, 2005, 02:54 PM
Depending on the mg per hour of ozone from the machine the car sized unit can be used in a room.

Key is what odors you are trying to remove and in what period of time. In a hotel with carpets; fabric furniture, bedspreads and curtains you have a lot of smoke smell to remove so you might need a larger unit.

The unit we offer puts out 1100 mg of ozone per hour which is more than enough for a vehicle.

Will it work effectively in a room would depend on the size of the room and the odors to remove.

If you want a larger unit it is available.

Bud Abraham

gb387
May 28th, 2005, 02:30 AM
Can an Ozone Machine remove the odors after a flood (mainly out of carpet)? I posted a question on it a week or so ago and received some suggestions to cure the problem. Would a ozone machine help in this case?

buda
May 28th, 2005, 05:27 AM
If you are talking about a flood that offended a home carpet I would not know about this situation.

I would suspect you might have to remove the carpet and mat, but you would have to speak to a professional carpet cleaner.

I do have some friends in the industry and I will see what they have to say about the situation.

Stay tuned.

Regards
Bud Abraham