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Detaillab
Feb 1st, 2007, 12:04 PM
What about the material used for aircraft windshelds and windows? Could ScratchX be used on them? Would the FAA be opposed to it's uise?

perkoz
Feb 1st, 2007, 02:03 PM
what's the aircraft model? Is it a Boeing jet? I can ask my friend that is working at the Warsaw Airport servicing jets.

John Keeling
Feb 1st, 2007, 02:38 PM
For airplane windows, try using M17 Clear plastic Cleaner followed by M10 Clear Plastic Polish. I know the Airforce uses those products on their jet canopies.

Superior Shine
Feb 1st, 2007, 05:58 PM
I use Plast-X.

Here is a Beech Staggerwing that I used it on.

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/500/stagger1.jpg

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/500/stag1.jpg

STG
Feb 2nd, 2007, 03:20 AM
Would you guys recommend a rotary to buff this out?

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/86/IAF_UH-60_after_birds_strike_outside.jpg

Mike Phillips
Feb 2nd, 2007, 09:01 AM
What about the material used for aircraft windshields and windows? Could ScratchX be used on them? Would the FAA be opposed to it's use?

ScratchX is formulated to be used on paint, not plastic. Meguiar's does not recommend using ScratchX on plastics so we're not sure that the FAA would have a recommendation for this products.

We do make 4 different products for use on plastics, one of them has a similar name to ScratchX and is called PlastX.

PlastX is safe for use on most plastic windows, the areas you can get into trouble are when you're working on any plastics that have a coating on them. The effectiveness of PlastX comes from the microscopic diminishing abrasives used in the formula to help remove small particles of plastic in an effort to remove defects by leveling the surface.

When used on plastics with a coating, it will act to remove the coating, so you need to find out what your working on before you work on it, that is does the plastic have a coating or not, otherwise you could be replacing some windows.

To be safe, you can stick with our M10 and M17 as John Keeling suggested.

TrufflePig
Feb 2nd, 2007, 09:04 AM
Superior SHine did you honestly detail a plane.

how long did that take you?

what steps did you use?

that's CRAZY!!!

Mike Phillips
Feb 2nd, 2007, 09:14 AM
I use Plast-X.

Here is a Beech Staggerwing that I used it on.



One thing to point out about Joe using PlastX, Joe's a Seasoned Pro, you can't beat years of hands-on, in the trenches experience with no amount of book knowledge.

Second thing is that in all likely hood the plastic being used on that plane is Plexiglas which is soft and easy to polish defects out of.

Many modern plastic windows are make out of Lexan and on a personal note, I have yet to find a way to, quickly, easily, consistently work on Lexan with great results. This type of plastic us very hard, often times coated and difficult to improve once it's become scratched and scuffed.

When working on clear plastic windows, alway test your product and application material in an inconspicuous area to make sure you can work safely.

Detaillab
Feb 2nd, 2007, 11:43 AM
ScratchX is formulated to be used on paint, not plastic. Meguiar's does not recommend using ScratchX on plastics so we're not sure that the FAA would have a recommendation for this products.

We do make 4 different products for use on plastics, one of them has a similar name to ScratchX and is called PlastX.

PlastX is safe for use on most plastic windows, the areas you can get into trouble are when you're working on any plastics that have a coating on them. The effectiveness of PlastX comes from the microscopic diminishing abrasives used in the formula to help remove small particles of plastic in an effort to remove defects by leveling the surface.

When used on plastics with a coating, it will act to remove the coating, so you need to find out what your working on before you work on it, that is does the plastic have a coating or not, otherwise you could be replacing some windows.

To be safe, you can stick with our M10 and M17 as John Keeling suggested.

Well said. I ment PlastX oops.

the other pc
Feb 2nd, 2007, 03:20 PM
Would you guys recommend a rotary to buff this out?

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/86/IAF_UH-60_after_birds_strike_outside.jpgBetter clay it first. I think I see bonded contaminants. :idea:


PC.

Mike Phillips
Feb 2nd, 2007, 03:22 PM
Better clay it first. I think I see bonded contaminants. :idea:

PC.

This is funny, we actually typed this up to post today and then instead posted a serious answer. :D :D :D

ronniejay
Feb 2nd, 2007, 10:06 PM
Would you guys recommend a rotary to buff this out?

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/86/IAF_UH-60_after_birds_strike_outside.jpg
I would start with a feather duster!

Sydster
Feb 2nd, 2007, 11:01 PM
I use Plast-X.

Here is a Beech Staggerwing that I used it on.

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/500/stagger1.jpg

http://archive.meguiarsonline.com/forums/photopost/data/500/stag1.jpg

Nice work on that plane Joe! :bow

nzgunnie
Feb 3rd, 2007, 07:36 PM
Another product to try is Micro-mesh, a series of fine polishing abrasive cloths, and a polish. Grades of abrasives go from 1500 - 12000 grit. Specifically designed for removing damage to acrylics and plastics. We used to use it for damage to aircraft canopies, but you need to be careful, don't start with the 1500 grit unless you really need to...!